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Tire Wear and Tear: Is It Still Good?

check your tire pressure

When was the last time you had your car tires checked? It doesn’t take much to get them checked for wear and tear. Along with the checking of the vehicle oil, tire pressure and tire alignment, you need to set time to check if your tires are still good enough to get on the road. Be more car care aware by doing your PART and follow these tips to keep your car tires in condition regularly.

P stands for pressure. Your car tires should always have the right pressure to keep you running on the road without mishaps. Tires should be inflated with the right pressure levels. When you put the wrong pressure level, your car tire could burst while you are driving and that could mean an accident of huge proportions. You can check the tires on a weekly or monthly basis or more often especially now because it’s winter. You don’t want to slip in the snow that melted and turned into slippery glass.

A is for alignment. You may not see it at first glance, but you can definitely feel it when you’re already on the road. Uneven tires can put your trip at risk. Make sure to have its alignment checked every month, especially when you’re planning for an out-of-town trip with you family this holiday season.

R means rotation. You don’t always need new tires. Rotation is the answer to your budgetary problems. If you don’t have much to buy all four new tires, all you need is to rotate them. This is to make sure that all tires have been used up properly and with the right balance.

T is for the tread. The penny test is the simplest way of checking if the tires are still in good condition or not. You simply have to put the penny in between the treads in your tires. If it still holds, then the tires are still in pretty good shape. However, if the penny falls, then your tires need immediate replacing.

So before you lose all hope that you can check your own tires, here are some tips to help you out. You only need to remember the acronym PART and you’ll be good to go.

measure tire tread